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ORGANIZATION

General Information

Year of creation: Year of beginning of the operations

Legal form: Charter type according to international categories (aligned with Atlas). Bank includes any specific charter type with bank license: commercial, microfinance, cooperative, or other. Specify the charter type name according to the national regulation in the comment section.

Regulated: Specify if the provider is subject to the financial regulation and to the supervision of a national supervisory authority (e.g. Central Bank, Ministry of Finance, etc.)

Status: Profit or not-for-profit

Currency used in the report: Fill in the three-letter currency of your country. See a list here.

Context

Data as of date: Input the end date of the period for which you are providing data. Put a date with day, month and year, in the format that is recognized by your computer and using "/"

Exchange rate: Refer to this site.

GNI/capita: See World Bank data for GNI per Capita Atlas Method in USD on this site.

Social Objectives

Mission statement: Specify the few sentences that define the mission statement of the provider.

United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

To know more about the Sustainable Development Goals, visit this site.

Governance

Number of board members: Fill in the number of board members.

Number of women board members: Fill in the number of women board members. This indicator is linked to ESG risks analysis to calculate Board gender diversity, and in particular in Europe on  Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation - Principal Adverse Impact indicator PAI 13

Branches

Number of branches: Fill in the total number of branches and points of services

Branches in urban areas: Areas constituting a city or town with higher density of population in comparison to the surrounding areas, where the majority of people do not dependent upon agriculture as main economic activity.

Branches in rural areas: Settled places outside towns and cities, such as villages, hamlets, where most livelihoods are farm based. Farm includes both crop and non crop agriculture, livestock. fishing, etc.

Number of branches in excluded/poor areas: areas that lack access to basic services such as water, electricity, education, health, sanitation, infrastructure; areas with basic services but that are far removed from urban centers.

  • In rural zones, these are areas characterized by poor infrastructure (roads, markets), lack of access to public services, and subsistence farming.
  • In urban zones, these are areas characterized by a high concentration of poor people, lack of access to public services, high unemployment (such as migrant settlements).

Number of branches/point of sales located in or near biodiversity-sensitive areas where activities can negatively affect those areas: Biodiversity-sensitive areas means Natura 2000 network of protected areas, UNESCO World Heritage sites and Key Biodiversity Areas (‘KBAs’), as well as other protected areas.

[Indicator linked to ESG risks analysis, and in particular in Europe on  Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation - Principal Adverse Impact indicator PAI 7 - Share of investments in investee companies with sites/operations located in or near to biodiversity-sensitive areas]

The provider should identify the number of branches located in or near biodiversity-sensitive areas with activities that can negatively affect those areas. The following websites can be used to define these areas at country level and/ or provide clear country map with identified biodiversity-sensitive areas so that it is possible to map with branches. The FSP’s branches are mapped with biodiversity-sensitive areas. For the branches in or near the biodiversity-sensitive areas, the segmentation of portfolio is checked. If activities can negatively affect those areas (agriculture/ forestry, charcoal production, etc.), the branches should be counted.
To identify the branches, the provider can check the following websites:

  • World Database on Protected Area
  • IBAT: The IBAT website is userfriendly but address of branches/point of sales need to be added with Latitude and Longitude. This can be found by using Google Maps. (Put the address in Google Maps. Right-click the place on the map. This will open a pop-up window. You can find your latitude and longitude in decimal format at the top. To copy the coordinates, left click on the altitude and longitude.)

If the provider has one or more branches where activities can negatively affect biodiversity-sensitive areas, check the mitigation measures taken to protect biodiversity. For this, check answers and comments on Dimension 7 of the Universal Standards, in particular, what policies, procedures, activities are implemented. See 7.A.1.1, 7.A.2.1, 7.A.2.1.3, 7.B.2.2 and 7.B.2.4.

Conclusion: for reporting:

  • 0 if no branches near biodiversity sensitive areas
  • 0 if Dimension 7 shows that a formal strategy and policy to protect biodiversity if implemented.

Staff composition and working conditions

Number of staff: Number of full-time equivalent staff directly hired by the provider

Women: Number of full-time equivalent women staff directly hired by the provider

Men: Number of full-time equivalent men staff directly hired by the provider

Number of exits of staff of the past 12 months (voluntary, forced): This data helps calculate the staff rotation rate in the Social Dashboard, based on the formula: Staff who left during the period / Total number of staff in the period

Number of exits of women staff during the period (voluntary, forced)

Number of staff in credit and front office operations: Do not include senior management staff here

  • Women
  • Men

Number of management staff: The administrative and back office staff is not taken into account in the details for staff by categories

  • Women: Number of women staff in management
  • Men: Number of men staff in management

Number of staff under 25 years of age: Data to analyze job positions for young staff

Annual total payroll: Specify the annual total payroll (with or without taxes, but aligned with data below)

The data will be used to automatically calculate the Gender Pay Gap

[Indicator linked to ESG risks analysis, and in particular in Europe on  Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation - Principal Adverse Impact indicator PAI 12]

Annual women payroll: Specify the annual total payroll for women.

The data will be used to automatically calculate the Gender Pay Gap. The annual total payroll for women will be divided by the number of women staff to get the average gross earnings of female, same for males, and Gender Pay Gap will be calculated as follows: (average gross earnings of male-average gross earnings of female)/ average gross earnings of male

As a reference, the OECD has data on Gender pay gap, from 2.5 to 31, average for OECD is 12% for 2020

Number of workdays lost to injuries, accidents, fatalities or illness (workdays lost): Report data collected by Human Resources department/unit on the reporting period, put in comments reasons for days lost

Number of staff who received an internal or external training on the reporting period: Report data collected by Human Resources department/unit on the reporting period, hours of training x number of staff attending. Put in the comment section the nature of trainings

Total hours of training (staff x hours)

Number of women staff who received an internal or external training on the reporting period

Total hours of training for women (women staff x hours)

Number of staff who received training on environmental performance management (organization environmental footprint, client vulnerability, client adverse impact, green products offered, assessment process, etc.) during the last reporting year: Organization environmental footprint, client vulnerability, client adverse impact, green products offered, assessment process, etc.

Total hours of trainings on environmental performance management (staff x hours of "green" training)

Total annual budget allocated to trainings: Compile budget for internal and external trainings for the reporting period

Total annual budget allocated to trainings related to environment and social policies and strategies: Compile budget for internal and external trainings for the reporting period

Average training budget per staff: Calculated automatically

Absenteeism rate: Calculate with number of days of absence from work over total number of days of work

Client composition

Number of active borrowers: For providers with group loans, please count each group member as a borrower

  • Women borrowers
  • Men borrowers
  • Legal entities

Rural borrowers: Borrowers living or working in rural areas

Urban borrowers

Number of voluntary savers

  • Women savers
  • Men savers
  • Legal entities

Total number of clients: The number of individuals who are active borrowers, depositors or both. Individuals who have multiple loans or accounts directly with the financial institution should be counted as a single client. The number should be based on individuals rather than the number of groups.

Number of clients gaining access to financial services for the first time during the reporting period: Number of clients who received formal financial services during the reporting period that they did NOT have access to BEFORE. It is not the number of new customers for the provider, but the number of new customers who have never previously accessed financial services, whether with the service provider concerned, or with any other formal banks or financial service providers. Services offered by loan sharks or participation in tontines are not considered formal financial services.
This indicator gives an idea of the role of the provider in Financial Inclusion.

Borrowers retention

Active borrowers at the beginning of the period: The data will be used to calculate the Borrowers retention rate (available in SPI Report dashboards) = Number of borrowers at the end of the period / (number of borrowers at the beginning of the period + number of new borrowers during the period)

  • Women

New borrowers during the period

  • Women

PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

Delivery models and partnerships

Physical channels: Products are provided by field staff, branches/vehicles; and in-person interaction with client.

Digital field applications for staff/agents: smartphone, tablet, POS machine.

Mobile loan disbursement and/or repayment: partnership with mobile money providers.

ATM, debit/credit cards, internet banking:

  • ATM: automated teller machine (ATM) is a device that enables customers to perform financial transactions, such as cash withdrawals, deposits, funds transfers, balance inquiries or account information inquiries, at any time and without the need for direct interaction with bank staff.
  • Debit/credit cards: Credit cards give the client access to a line of credit issued by a bank, while debit cards deduct money directly from the client bank account.
  • Internet banking application: enquiry, transfer, payment, etc.

Online lending: through computer/phone/tablet (internet loan request, assessment, disbursement and repayment)

Mobile lending: USSD phone loan request, assessment, disbursement and repayment, in partnership with mobile money provider.

Other mobile financial services: saving deposit/withdrawal, insurance premium payment/claim settlement, transfer, payment-bills, bulk payments, etc. done in partnership with mobile money providers.

Pay As You Go (PAYG): utility computing billing method. A PAYG user is billed for procured, rather than actual, computing resources. PAYG is also known as Pay & Go, Pay Per Usage, Pay Per Use or Pay-As-You-Use.

Number of partnerships established during the reporting period: Partnership requires a formal contract/memorandum of understanding (MOU) to work on specific deliverables on a specific timeframe.

Loans

Microenterprise loans: Loans for microentreprises with 5 staff or less

SME loans: Loans for small and medium enterprises (more than 5 staff and less than 250)

Loans for agriculture: Loans for crop, animal production, forestry, fishing/aquaculture

Loans for education: Loans for education of one member of the household

Emergency loans: Short-term loans intended to help clients meet unexpected non-business expenses

Housing loans: Loans for building, renovating, improving housing

Consumer loans: Loans to buy consumption products

Microleasing: The provider rents equipment or other durable goods to microentrepreneurs. This service can be provided directly by the provider or offered in partnership

Other, please specify in comments

Deposits

Voluntary sight deposits: The funds are saved voluntarily and are payable on demand to the depositor. Includes any current, checking or savings accounts from individuals and legal entities.

Compulsory savings (cash collateral): The funds are compulsory to guarantee a loan and cannot be withdrawn before the loan is repaid.

Voluntary time deposits: The funds are saved voluntarily and are payable on a specific agreed term/ maturity date.

Other, please specify in comments

Insurance

Mandatory life insurance: Insurance requested to access loans. Life insurance covers the remaining amount of the credit, and potentially funeral and/or endowment insurance.

Voluntary life insurance: Insurance not requested to access loans. Life insurance covers the remaining amount of the credit, and potentially funeral and/or endowment insurance.

Agriculture insurance: Insurance that covers the loss of crops or animals under pre-defined conditions

Property insurance: Insurance that covers medical/hospital expenses for the client and potentially the members of the household under pre-defined conditions

Other, please specify in comments

Other financial services

Debit / credit card: A debit card is used to make an electronic withdrawal of funds on deposit at a bank, usually for purchasing goods or obtaining cash. A credit card can be used repeatedly to borrow money or buy goods and services on credit

Payment services: The provider acts as an intermediary for payments between clients and third parties, such as utility providers, allowing clients to set up payment plans that are debited directly from accounts hosted at the provider's level.

Factoring: Factoring is a technique for financing and collecting trade receivables implemented by enterprises. The provider grants the enterprise advance financing on the basis of its trade receivables, and takes charge of their recovery.

Savings facilitation services: Rather than offering deposit accounts directly to clients, the provider acts as an intermediary between clients and depository institutions, connecting clients with third-party deposit accounts.

Remittance/money transfer services: The provider facilitates remittances nationally, internationally or both. This service can be provided directly or offered through a partnership

Other, please specify in comments

Non financial services

Enterprise services: Enterprise services can include business skills development, business development services and other business services.

Education services: Education services may include financial literacy education, basic health/nutrition education, child and youth education, occupational safety and health in the workplace education and other education services.

Financial literacy education: Training that covers topics related to financial planning, budget management, savings, investments, loans, interest rates, etc.

Health services: Health services may include basic medical services, special medical services for women and children and other medical services.

Women's empowerment services: Women's empowerment services may include leadership training for women, women's rights education/gender issues training, counseling/legal services for female victims of violence and other women's empowerment service

Non financial services on environmental performance (information / training / technical assistance on environmental risk management / green practices and technologies): Awareness campaigns, training and technical assistance on the management of clients environmental risks (vulnerabilities to climate change and environmental degradation, negative impacts on the environment) and on the adoption of practices and eco-responsible technologies.

Other non financial services

Non financial services outreach (number of clients reached during period): Please indicate the total number of clients reached by these services during the reporting period

Number of partnerships established during the reporting period with specialized organizations (experts, NGOs, public entities, providers, etc.) to implement the environmental performance strategy: Partnerships with a formal contract, deliverables, timeline, with experts, NGOs, public entities, technical providers, etc.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION & EXTERNAL REPORTING

Key financial indicators

Total Assets, volume, currency used in the report

Percentage of shares owned by local investors

Return on Assets (%): What is my assets capacity of generating profit to grow ?

ROA = (Net income after taxes and before donations)/(Average assets)

Return on Equity (%): How much do my shareholders earn/do I capitalize every year

ROE = (Net income after taxes and before donations)/(Average equity)

Financial Expense Ratio (as a % of average GLP) : How much does the funding of my portfolio cost ?

Funding Expense Ratio = (Total financial expenses)/(Average gross loan portfolio)

Operating Expense Ratio (as a % of average GLP): How much do my loan operation cost ? How efficient am I ?

Operation Exepense Ratio = (Operating expenses)/(Average gross loan portfolio)

Operational Self-Sufficiency (%): What is my level of sustainability

OSS = (Operating revenue)/(Operating expenses+loan loss provision expenses+financial expenses)

Nominal Portfolio Yield (%): How much do I actually earn from my credit activities ?

Portfolio Yield = (Financial revenue from loan portfolio)/(Average gross loan portfolio)

PAR >30 + rescheduled (%): What part of my portfolio is at risk/contaminates by arrears?

Parn = (Outstanding balance with arrears over "n" days+total gross outsanding renegotiated portfolio)/(Total outstanding gross loan portfolio)

PAR >30 + rescheduled (%) for women

Write-offs (during the period) (%): Which part of my portfolio has been lost ?

Writte-off Ratio = (Amounts written off for the period)/(Total outstanding gross loan portfolio)

[Benchmark : 1%]

Loan Loss Expense Ratio

Pricing of loans

How does the provider calculate the interest rate of its most representative loan product?

Average APR of the loan portfolio: Click here to calculate APR

Endorsement / Membership

Client Protection "Commitment to Implement" Signatory: Click if you have signed-up for the Client Protection Pathway and you are listed on this page

Paying member of the Social Performance Task Force: See membership conditions here

Atlas data platform reporting: See more information here

When you create an SPI audit, you can authorize Cerise to share data with Atlas (see Authoization in the settings).

Sa-Dhan (India): This relates to specific Code of Conducts implemented in countries of EU, India and Cambodia.

Code of Conduct Assessment (India)

Other social performance initiative (please specify)

Ratings, assessments and certifications

Most recent Client Protection certification (Rating Agency): See here the Certification bodies for CP certification from Cerise+SPTF framework. Put in comment if the provider is certified with another organization

  • Date
  • Certification?

Most recent Social Rating (Rating Agency)

  • Date
  • Rating grade: Please first choose a Rating agency

BASIC PORTFOLIO INFORMATION

Gross Loan Portfolio

Amount of Gross Loan Portfolio in the currency used in the report: Includes the outstanding principal balance of the provider's all outstanding loans including current, delinquent and rescheduled loans, but not loans that had been written off. Before provisions and except interest expected not received.

Gross Loan Portfolio in rural areas

Gross Loan Portfolio to women

Gross Loan Portfolio for Green products and technologies: Volume of "green" loans outstanding including for renewable energy technologies/ energy efficiency technologies; sustainable agriculture; other; or total of "Green" portfolio in detailed segmentation. Provide in comments the nature of the "green" definition, taxonomy or classification by the provider

Gross Loan Portfolio classified as medium/high risk for social or environmental issues: Automatically calculated from the portfolio segmentation by sector

Portfolio by Lending methodology

Group loan

Individual loan (offline/direct)

Individual loan (online/digital)

Deposits portfolio

Amount of total deposits in the currency used in the report: The total value of funds placed in an account with a provider that are payable on demand to a depositor. This item includes any current, checking, or savings accounts that are payable on demand. It also includes time deposits which have a fixed maturity date.

Amount of total deposits by women in the currency used in the report

Amount of voluntary deposits in the currency used in the report

Amount of voluntary deposits by women in the currency used in the report

ADVANCED PORTFOLIO INFORMATION

Number of outstanding loans

Total number of outstanding loans: An outstanding loan is a loan that has been disbursed, but is neither paid in full nor written off. The outstanding portfolio is the unpaid principal balance of all loans owed to a lender.

Number of outstanding rural loans

Number of outstanding loans to women

Total number of loans disbursed for energy efficiency, renewable energy during the reporting period

Loan portfolio by purpose

Legal entities - Microenterprises (less than 5 full time employees)

Legal entities - SME (between 5 and 250 full time employees)

Legal entities - Corporates (more than 250 full time employees)

Housing

Education

Personal/Household consumption

Other

Loan portfolio by sector

This segmentation is based on the NACE segmentation. NACE (Nomenclature of Economic Activities) is the European statistical classification of economic activities. For each sector, we provide the links with the IFC Factsheets to identify risks and how to mitigate them. The online ESG tool of the FMO also has a good overview of specific risks and measures to address them for different sectors of the portfolio.

1 - AGRICULTURE, FORESTRY AND FISHING (NACE A): Please provide Level 2 information if Level 1 represents more than 5% of the total GLP [and more than an absolute amount to be defined]
If Agriculture, forestry and fishing portfolio is more than 5% of the total GLP [or more than XXX USD equivalent], check 7B22 on identification of adverse impact, and 7B24 on categorization by level of risks and implementation of mitigation actions, 7C21 and 7C22 on support with awareness raising and capacity building.

If scores on these 4 indicators show good practices, then PAI 2.11= NO

If scores on these 4 indicators is low, then PAI 2.11 could be "Yes" or "Maybe" and additional check should be done: issues on non sustainable agri in the country: deforestation, coffee with no control on water, etc.

This could be checked with Fair trade guidance on ESG risks for example

Still need to define the thresholds: amount of portfolio in agri, and what is "not sustainable practices"?

2 - MINING AND QUARRYING (NACE B)

  • Extraction of crude petroleum and natural gas & Mining: IFC Factsheet Oil and Gas - NACE 6 Extraction of crude petroleum and natural gas
  • Other mining activities/ raw materials extraction: NACE 5 Mining of coal and lignite; NACE 7 Mining of metal ores; NACE 8 Other mining and quarrying; NACE 9 Mining support service activities

3 - MANUFACTURING (NACE C)

  • Manufacture of food and beverages: IFC Factsheet Food and Beverages - NACE 10 Manufacture of food products; NACE 11 Manufacture of beverages
  • Manufacture of textile: IFC Factsheet Textiles and Apparel - NACE 13 Manufacture of textiles
  • Manufacture of leather, wearing apparel (including fur), and related products: IFC Factsheet Leather and Footwear - NACE 14 Manufacture of wearing apparel (including fur); NACE 15 Manufacture of leather and related products
  • Manufacture of wood and of products of wood and cork, except furniture; manufacture of articles of straw and plaiting materials: IFC Factsheet Wood products - NACE 16 Manufacture of wood and of products of wood and cork, except furniture; manufacture of articles of straw and plaiting materials
  • Manufacture of paper and paper products: IFC Factsheet Pulp and Paper - NACE 17 Manufacture of paper and paper products
  • Printing / film processing facilities/printing services: IFC Factsheet Printing - NACE 18 Printing and reproduction of recorded media
  • Manufacture of coke and refined petroleum products: NACE 19 Manufacture of coke and refined petroleum products
  • Manufacture of chemicals, rubber and plastic products, paint: IFC Factsheet Chemicals, Plastic and Paints - NACE 20 Manufacture of chemicals and chemical products; NACE 22 Manufacture of rubber and plastic products
  • Manufacture of basic pharmaceuticals products and pharmaceutical preparations: IFC Factsheet Pharmaceuticals - NACE 21 Manufacture of basic pharmaceutical products and pharmaceutical preparations
  • Manufacture of glass and glass products, porcelaine and ceramic products: IFC Factsheet Glass and Ceramic Products - NACE 23,1 Manufacture of glass and glass products; NACE 23,4 Manufacture of other porcelain and ceramic products
  • Manufacture of cement and concrete / brick making/ construction works: IFC Factsheet Cement and Concrete - NACE 23,5 Manufacture of cement, lime and plaster; NACE 23,6 Manufacture of articles of concrete, cement and plaster
  • Manufacture of basic metals, fabricated metal products: IFC Factsheet Iron, Steel and other Metals - NACE 24 Manufacture of basic metals; NACE 25 Manufacture of fabricated metal products, except machinery and equipment
  • Manufacture of computer, electronics (including watches, clocks, precision instruments, photographic equipment, medical equipment) and optical products: IFC Factsheet Electronic Product and IFC Factsheet Precision Instruments - NACE 26 Manufacture of computer, electronic and optical products; NACE 27 Manufacture of electrical equipment
  • Manufacture of machinery and equipment n.e.c: IFC Factsheet Metal Products and Machinery - NACE 28 Manufacture of machinery and equipment n.e.c.
  • Manufacture of handicrafts:
  • Manufacture of jewellery, bijouterie and related articles: NACE 32,1 Manufacture of jewellery, bijouterie and related articles
  • Other manufacturin activities: NACE 12 Manufacture of tobaco products: NACE 29 Manufacture of motor vehicles, trailers and semi-trailers; NACE 30 Manufacture of other transport equipment; NACE 31 Manufacture of furniture; NACE 32 Other manufacturing; NACE 33 Repair and installation of machinery and equipment; NACE 23,2 Manufacture of refractory products; NACE 23,3 Manufacture of clay building materials; NACE 23,7 Cutting, shaping and finishing of stone; NACE 23,9 Manufacture of abrasive products and non-metallic mineral products n.e.c.

4 - ELECTRICITY, GAS, STEAM AND AIR CONDITIONING SUPPLY (NACE D)

  • Renewable Energy
  • Combustion based and other non renewable energy

5 - WATER SUPPLY; SEWERAGE, WASTE MANAGEMENT AND REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES (NACE E)

  • Water collection, treatment and supply: IFC Factsheet Water Supply - NACE 36 Water collection, treatment and supply
  • Sewerage, waste collection, treatment and disposal activities; materials recovery: IFC Factsheet Recycling Waste Treatment - NACE 37 Sewerage; NACE 38 Waste collection, treatment and disposal activities; materials recovery; NACE 39 Remediation activities and other waste management services
  • Waste management and remediation

6 - CONSTRUCTION (NACE F)

7 - WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE (excluding repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles) (NACE G)

  • Garages (repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles): IFC Factsheet Garages and Petrol Station - NACE 45,2 Maintenance and repair of motor vehicles; NACE 45,4 Sale, maintenance and repair of motorcycles and related parts and accessories
  • Wholesale of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels and related products
  • Retail sale of automotive fuel in specialised stores
  • Other wholesale and retail trade

8 - TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE (NACE H)

  • Transport and storage of fossil fuels
  • Other transport and storage

9 - ACCOMODATION AND FOOD SERVICES ACTIVITIES

10 - FINANCIAL AND INSURANCE ACTIVITIES (NACE K)

11 - REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES (NACE L)

12 - HEALTH (NACE Q)

13 - OTHER SERVICE ACTIVITIES (NACE S)

  • Washing and (dry-)cleaning of textile and fur products
  • Other service activities

14 - NON PRODUCTIVE LOANS

Loan portfolio by term of the loans

1-90 days

91-180 days

181-365 days

12-24 months

over 2 years

Loan portfolio by size of the loans

The MIS may not allow for this exact segmentation by size of loans, but the idea is to get the closest segmention. Please explain in the comments what is the segmentation used in USD equivalent.

$0 to $50

$50 to $500

$501 to $2,000

$2,001 to $5,000

$5,001 to $10,000

$10,001 to $50,000

$50,001 to $100,000

$100,001 to $250,000

$250,001 to $500,000

over $500,000

ECOLOGICAL FOOTPRINT OR ESG CHECK

Environemental check: Energy, resources, waste

Total electricity consumption at headquarters and branches, for the reporting period (or year?) in kWh: Indicate the number of kWh of electricity consumed by the provider at head office and branch level, for its needs for lighting, heating/air conditioning, powering electrical appliances, charging electric vehicles, and others. Indicate the number of total kWh, including electricity from the electricity grid and electricity from off-grid sources (eg photovoltaic systems, diesel generators, etc.).

% Off grid renewable (solar, wind, biomass/biofuels, water/geothermal)

% Off grid non-renewable (coal, natural gas, generator)

Fuel consumption in liters: Indicate the number of liters of fuel (gasoline, diesel, heavy fuel oil, etc.) consumed for the service provider's vehicles, generators and other equipment.

Water consumption at headquarters and branches for the reporting year (in m3)

Paper consumption at headquarters and branches for the reporting year (in kg)

Waste disposed at headquarters and branches for the reporting year (in metric tons): Indicate the number of tons of waste generated by the service provider at its head office and its branches, all types of waste combined (paper, plastics, metal, organic, etc.) and regardless of the method of management of this waste.

Waste disposed recycled/reused for the reporting year (in metric tons): Indicate, among the waste generated by the service provider, the number of tonnes of waste sorted by the service provider and then subject to recovery (recycling, reuse). This may include paper waste (reuse, recycling), plastics, metal (recycling) or organic waste (composting).

Total GHG emissions

Scope 1 Greenhouse gas emissions: direct emissions from owned or controlled sources. GHG emissions will be calculated through a proxy based on information about the provider (including sector breakdown of the portfolio). Please, complete financial information and portfolio breakdown and refer to the JIM (Joint Impact Model), Impact Initiative, or other provider that calculates GHG emissions proxies.

  • [Indicator linked to ESG risks analysis, and in particular in Europe on  Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation - Principal Adverse Impact indicator PAI 1]

Scope 2 Greenhouse gas emissions: indirect emissions from the generation of purchased energy. GHG emissions will be calculated through a proxy based on information about the provider (including sector breakdown of the portfolio). Please, complete financial information and portfolio breakdown and refer to the JIM (Joint Impact Model), Impact Initiative, or other provider that calculates GHG emissions proxies.

  • [Indicator linked to ESG risks analysis, and in particular in Europe on  Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation - Principal Adverse Impact indicator PAI 1]

Scope 3 Greenhouse gas emissions: all indirect emissions (not included in Scope 2) that occur in the value chain of the reporting company, including both upstream and downstream emissions. GHG emissions will be calculated through a proxy based on information about the provider (including sector breakdown of the portfolio). Please, complete financial information and portfolio breakdown and refer to the JIM (Joint Impact Model), Impact Initiative, or other provider that calculates GHG emissions proxies.

  • [Indicator linked to ESG risks analysis, and in particular in Europe on  Sustainable Finance Disclosure Regulation - Principal Adverse Impact indicator PAI 1]

Social check

Sanction (e.g. fine/administrative/judicial sanctions) or non-monetary punishment regarding to the following topics:

  • Business practices against consumers or usury against national Consumer Protection Law
  • Non compliance of National Labour Law
  • Funding environmentally damaging activities?
  • Tax evasion or avoidance
  • Non compliance with national Anti Money Laundering Law

Report as violations all internal findings that have been identified and reported to financial authorities/supervisor/ legal instances.

In case YES sanctions/punishments have been identified for each topic please check:

  • the year when the sanctions/punishments occur,
  • total amount (fines of equivalent monetary value),
  • action plans to put in place to avoid being eligible to such sanctions/punishments in the future.

You can also find information about it in audited financial statements and/or internal audit reports and can also do crosschecks with Internal Audit and Compliace Department to verify data.

Business practices: All behaviors in credit operations and sales with direct financing that violate the rights of consumers. In multiple cases, theses sanctions are the result of complaints filed at the Consumer Protection Institution by consumers, as well as by some local law enforcement authorities.

Labor rights: If publically available, verify if there are labor-related disputes that the providers are facing at the National Labor Court (e.g. with Compliance/Legal Department).

Environmentally damaging activities: Providers are at risk of decreased cash flows due to unforeseen environmental costs faced by borrowers. These costs can include compliance with costly environmental regulations, fines for non compliance, clean up costs, lost revenue from damaged reputation, production limitation or termination. Legal and regulatory system responsible for such environmental regulatory enforcement are often being weak. Supervisors are not checking this point or given sanctions on it. Providers are also at reputational and media risk for environmental activism by community or other public interest groups (NGOs). Therefore, verify if the provider is funding environmentally damaging activities. If so, is it transitioning away, or how can it transition away, to more environmentally friendly activities.

Tax evasion: Verify if the provider is tax compliant and is providing to the relevant authorities information that is relevant or required by law for purposes of the correct determination of taxes to be assessed in connection with their operations (e.g. with Finance Department/infomation in Factsheets/audited financial statements).
Anti Money Laundering: Providers (regulated and unregulated) are supervised by national authorities according to national AML/FT law. For AML/FT please also check KYC report and if the provider has appropiate anti-money laundering systems in place. You can also do crosschecks with  Compliance Department.

Dispute in courts, lawsuits, convictions for the provider or its employees related to the following topics:

  • Dispute in courts with current or former clients
  • Anti-Money Laundry/Fight against Terrorism
  • Corruption including extorsion and bribery

Report as violations all internal findings that have been identified and reported to financial authorities/supervisor/ legal instances. Verify if there are individual civil cases / lawsuits that the provider is facing with employees or clients (e.g. with Compliance/Legal Department).

Internal audit checks has identified and/or reported instances of:

  • Fraud
  • Money laundering scheme or financing of terrorism (regarding borrowers)
  • Bribery/corruption (regarding borrowers)

Verify with Internal Audit (internal audit reports) or equivalent; as well as with management and during field visits (cross-check). If yes, please detail the number, nature and gravity of cases; as well as the actions taken after the identification.

Employee labor issues in the last reporting period

  • Accidents
  • Strikes
  • Violation of labor law
  • Dispute in courts with current or former employees labour dispute in court"

Governance check

Number of independent board members: An independent director, in corporate governance, refers to a member of a board of directors who does not have a material relationship with the provider and is neither part of its executive team nor involved in the day-to-day operations of the provider.

Adequate accounting and auditing systems, including:

  • Quarterly financial reports approved by the CEO or executive board
  • Annual financial statements audited by recognized firm

Adequate corporate governance:

  • A board of directors which meets regularly
  • Records of shareholders, if applicable
  • Other equivalent document for legal forms without shareholders, if applicable
  • Annual shareholders’ meetings, OR Annual General Assembly meetings.
  • All shareholders / members are provided with all material information and a detailed agenda in advance of meetings

OUTCOMES AND SDG

Clients by profile

Number of end-beneficiaries being low income households (as per national definition or provider’s own client segmentation)

Number of young clients (or borrowers)

Number of illiterate clients (or borrowers)

Number of disabled clients (or borrowers)

Number of active SMEs financed

Number of newly founded SMEs financed

Client Satisfaction

If you do not track this data, please note N/A and specify in the comments column

How many complaints has the provider received in the last 3 months?

Of these complaints in the last 3 months, how many come from women?

Of these complaints in the last 3 months, how many have been resolved?

If the provider has conducted a satisfaction survey in the last 12 months, % of the clients who declared to be satisfied or very satisfied by the provider:

On this satisfaction survey, % of women clients who declared to be satisfied or very satisfied?

Net Promoter Score: Score reflecting the percentage of the provider's clients who are likely to recommend the provider’s product or service as of the end of the reporting period, compared with the percentage who are unlikely to recommend it. Providers can use the question "How likely is it that you would recommend [product/service] to a friend or colleague?" to collect data from clients against this metric. Respondents should rank their likelihood to recommend on a 0-10 scale, with 0 representing "not at all likely to recommend," 10 representing "extremely likely to recommend,"and 5 representing "neutral." Clients ranking themselves as a 9 or 10 are considered "extremely likely" or "Promoters." Clients ranking themselves as a 7 or 8 are considered "Passives." Clients ranking themselves as 0-6 are considered "unlikely" or "Detractors."

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Changes for clients

Number of borrowers with increased income (or business assets) on next loan cycle (from MIS and loan application forms)

Number of SMEs with increased income (or business assets) on next loan cycle (from MIS and loan application forms)

Number of SMEs with improved business practices (e.g. new products, new markets/clients, new delivery channels, improved HR policies)

Number of jobs supported

Number of new jobs created

Number of women borrowers declaring that they have used the loan for their own economic activity

Number of women borrowers declaring that they have the capacity to contribute financially to the household needs